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Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

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Baluster vase with flowers

Glossary (4)

earthenware, porcelain, slip, stoneware

  • earthenware

    Ceramic material made of clay which is fired to a temperature of c.1000-1200⁰c. The resulting ceramic is non-vitreous and varies in colour from dark red to yellow.

  • porcelain

    Ceramic material composed of kaolin, quartz, and feldspar which is fired to a temperature of c.1350-1400⁰c. The resulting ceramic is vitreous, translucent, and white in colour.

  • slip

    A semi-fluid clay applied to a ceramic before glazing either to coat the surface or for decorative effect.

  • stoneware

    Ceramic material made of clay which is fired to a temperature of c.1200-1300⁰c and is often buff or grey in colour.

Location

    • Second floor | Room 36 | Japan

Objects are sometimes moved to a different location. Our object location data is usually updated on a monthly basis. Contact the Jameel Study Centre if you are planning to visit the museum to see a particular object on display, or would like to arrange an appointment to see an object in our reserve collections.

 

Publications online

  • Japanese Decorative Arts of the Meiji Period 1868-1912 by Oliver Impey and Joyce Seaman

    Japanese Decorative Arts of the Meiji Period

    Baluster-shaped porcelain vase decorated in underglaze green, white and mauve with raised white enamel, showing clumps of flowers on a mottled green ground. Signed on base in underglaze blue: Makuzu Kōzan sei.

    New underglaze colours, such as pink and green, colours that would stand a high temperature firing, were developed around this time, partly through the assistance of Gottfried Wagener, a scientific polymath, who was an oyatoi gaijin, a foreigner employed by the Japanese government to develop Japanese industry and art industry. Kōzan was one of the first to seek his advice, and to exploit the full range of these colours (as was Namikawa Yasuyuki for enamels [see EA1988.1, EA1993.39, EA1995.151, EA2000.48, EA2000.180, EA2002.177]).

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